Press

Published articles featuring Anna and Bonnie.

What are the key factors when analysing my business?

The beauty industry is growing at an extremely fast rate and becoming more challenging every year. Therefore, it is crucial to find out what is working and what is not working in salons and spas.

Analysing your business is vital and here are some key pointers to ensure you are operating at optimum efficiency. Make sure you choose the right software to give you all the accurate information you need.

The two key performance indicators to analyse constantly are your wage percentage and management of white space.

The key to managing your wage percentage is to ensure your therapists are working on as high revenue treatments as possible. Of course, there is always going to be a mix of treatments in your offering to clients but getting this mix right is vital to keep your wage percentage at a level that will ensure profitability at the end of the day. Analysis of your wage percentage every week is essential and will show quite clearly if you have your therapists working on the right mix of treatments.

It is so important to have a senior member of your team managing white space every day. This will enable you to clearly see how your days and weeks are mapping out and to react accordingly to fill the diary as quickly as possible. Full diaries are happy days!

Other key areas of your business to analyse are re-booking rates, retail sale percentage v treatment revenue, and how many new clients are you attracting?

Professional Beauty Magazine  – Ask The Experts

How should I prioritise clients’ bookings when I reopen?

Covid-19 has shut down beauty salons and spas across the UK for more than 14 weeks now, but every day we are getting closer to re-opening, and, fingers crossed, expecting huge demand for beauty appointments.

So, if that huge demand does materialise, who do you ensure gets the first appointments? Loyalty comes first. A great deal of thought needs to be given to who you prioritise, but top of the list should be your loyal/VIP clients. If you have a loyalty scheme it will be clear who those clients are, and if you do not, get your team together to make a list of your most loyal clients. They will be the people who have supported you regularly for a number of years.

A call from the salon owner or manager to the client will help to cement your relationship, and of course make the client feel special. Secondly, it will be important to create a priority booking list, which is a fair way to allocate time to clients. Clients who were booked in before lockdown, and were consequently unable to have their treatments, should be contacted and given the opportunity to make an appointment as a priority.

Some consideration should also be given to trying to book higher-revenue treatments and upselling so that when your salon does re-open you can maximise profitability as soon as possible. Finally, the rotas for your team will have taken a great deal of time to organise because of the need to ensure that the salon is operating safely. Emphasise to clients that it is a desire to protect them and your teams that has led to limited availability in the early stages of reopening.

“Once you know your ideal client you will be in a much better position to sell your services and see your business flourish.”

Professional Beauty Magazine  – Ask The Experts

What research do I need to undertake to determine my ideal client and better reach them?

“Covid-19 has shut down beauty salons and spas across the UK for more than 14 weeks now, but every day we are getting closer to re-opening, and, fingers crossed, expecting huge demand for beauty appointments.
So, if that huge demand does materialise, who do you ensure gets the first appointments? Loyalty comes first. A great deal of thought needs to be given to who you prioritise, but top of the list should be your loyal/VIP clients. If you have a loyalty scheme it will be clear who those clients are, and if you do not, get your team together to make a list of your most loyal clients. They will be the people who have supported you regularly for a number of years.

A call from the salon owner or manager to the client will help to cement your relationship, and of course make the client feel special. Secondly, it will be important to create a priority booking list, which is a fair way to allocate time to clients. Clients who were booked in before lockdown, and were consequently unable to have their treatments, should be contacted and given the opportunity to make an appointment as a priority.

Some consideration should also be given to trying to book higher-revenue treatments and upselling so that when your salon does re-open you can maximise profitability as soon as possible. Finally, the rotas for your team will have taken a great deal of time to organise because of the need to ensure that the salon is operating safely. Emphasise to clients that it is a desire to protect them and your teams that has led to limited availability in the early stages of reopening.”

Professional Beauty Magazine  – Ask The Experts